Seven days of nature: 4

Of course plants in Australia bud. That’s the way plants do it, regardless of hemisphere. However, in the deep south they don’t usually emerge from mere sticks and bare branches, and I suppose I don’t walk the same path quite so daily as I do in Warsaw. I’m riveted by the emergence of spring buds here, such a luxuriance of budding: a profusion, a plethora, a cornucopia, a plenitude, a riot, a bounty, an opulence, a rampage, an uproar, an extravagance, a deluge, a flourish. A fanfare  for the arrival of Pani Wiosna, Lady Spring. 

  
 

Thank you for challenging me Gilly.

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About morselsandscraps

A retired Australian who spends a lot of time in Warsaw, and blogs as a way of life.
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31 Responses to Seven days of nature: 4

  1. Tish Farrell says:

    Spring in action. Lovely shots, Meg. It’s interesting how going somewhere else and looking, makes you ‘see’ home territory with fresh (mind’s) eyes too. The mind broadening effect of displacement exemplified too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • There’d’ve been a lot more, but I’m missing my flower camera and I haven’t quite tamed this one. The first shot was a real surprise. I’m still seeing through the lens of home a bit, or at least seeing things in comparison with home. I wonder if I’ll get transported into pure northern hemisphere ever?

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Sue says:

    Beautiful images, Meg, and here’s to Pani Wiosna!

    Like

  3. desleyjane says:

    Love your telling of the emergence of spring! That last bud looks a little bit like my frangipani back home. *sigh*

    Like

  4. restlessjo says:

    Pani Wiosna! 🙂 I love that, Meg 🙂 Just this afternoon I was doing something a bit similar in our local country park. It was just too nice to be indoors. I partly had Jude’s Macro in mind but mostly I was just enjoying the sunshine. Love that first shot. Do you know what it is? Magdanolia, perhaps?

    How are you finding it, being surrounded by constant Polish? As bad as you thought? But there are obvious compensations. 🙂 🙂

    Like

    • Pani Wiosna is the centre of the displays of preschoolers work in the foyer: that’s how I met her. ID? J’s on its case – a few photo walks and a tree book. I know nothing. I’ll check out your suggestion. As for Polish, I can pick out a few words. Again J is often my guide. His work is paying off in comprehension. I’m enjoying the fact that the twins speak English – or Penglish on occasion. Last night they were yelling a hybrid as they began to tear down the hill on their bikes.

      Like

  5. Lucid Gypsy says:

    So it’s partly about intensity making you notice more tiny details in smaller landscapes?
    These budlings are fabulous. Today I saw some sticky ones, have you seen any, they’re a rich shiny brown? Your first square one on the right looks like green winged flies settling on the twigs.
    Gorgeous, gorgeous photos 🙂

    Like

  6. Suzanne says:

    I love the way you continue your acute observation of nature in Warsaw. Your photos are really enlivening.

    Like

  7. Rosemary Barnard says:

    I wondered whether and how the “eye” you had developed in Australia in recent times would transfer across into your Polish photographic efforts. Here is the answer. These photos do great justice to the subjects. They are wonderful in encapsulating the miracle of a Polish spring.

    Like

    • Transferring the eye can be a problem. I remember talking to an Australian photographer who’d gone to Antarctic as mechanic and photographer and he had to relearn everything. Not as extreme here! J got a good haul of budding photos yesterday – not good enough of course, being J.

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      • Rosemary Barnard says:

        Then I look forward to the time when you will transfer the “new” part of the eye to Potato Point when you return. I expect some real stunners if these photos are anything to go by.

        Like

  8. pommepal says:

    I love how you are capturing the miracle of spring unfurling in your photos, and your words of description leave me breathless Meg

    Like

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